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The Best Desserts Near Prince Conti Hotel in the French Quarter

The Best Desserts Near Prince Conti Hotel in the French Quarter
Photo courtesy of The Bombay Club on Facebook

New Orleans is the city of over-indulgence, known for its cocktails and rich Creole cuisine. It’s also a great place for desserts. Doberge cake, bananas Foster, pralines and snoballs are just a few confections that were invented or perfected in the Big Easy. Looking for a place to satisfy your sweet tooth? Here are a few essential spots in the French Quarter — start with dessert-caliber breakfast and end with hot buttered rum. Life is sweet.

Arnaud’s (813 Bienville St.)

“Bread Pudding Fitzmorris” at this iconic and upscale Creole establishment is named after the city’s famous food critic and radio host of “The Food Show” on WWL Tom Fitzmorris. It’s not his recipe, but Fitzmorris praised this version of the dessert so much the restaurant owner named it after him. Antoine’s bread pudding is bread layered with thick slabs of custard and thinner layers of cinnamon and topped with rum-soaked raisins and warm Bourbon Sauce. It’s also offered as part of Arnaud’s excellent jazz brunch menu. Then, of course, there’s a whole slew of classic New Orleans desserts beyond bread pudding, like the old-fashioned pecan pie, bananas Foster, and café brûlot (hot spiced coffee flamed with brandy tableside).

Bombay Club (830 Conti St.)

Nightcap or dessert? A sweet cocktail such as Irish coffee, brandy milk punch or a grasshopper solves the age-old dilemma. There’s also bread pudding and house-made ice cream floats at this swanky live jazz club.

Brennan’s (417 Royal St.)

To this day, the original recipe Bananas Foster is Brennan’s most-ordered item. The restaurant reportedly flames 35,000 pounds of bananas for the famous dessert. The dramatic, tableside-flambéed original remains a standalone draw for the post-dinner crowd, visitors and locals alike, who flock to enjoy just the dessert, maybe with a cocktail, at the restaurant’s lush, iconic courtyard.

Café Conti (830 Conti St.)

Sweeten up breakfast with a Nutella and banana, peaches and cream or chocolate and strawberry crepe, among other flavors. Sometimes there’s also a sweet French toast of the day at this elegant little café.

Café du Monde (800 Decatur St.)

It wouldn’t be a trip to New Orleans without a beignet (or three). Deep-fried and dusted with powdered sugar, they’re a little bit of heaven served with a cup of café au lait.Court of Two Sisters (613 Royal St.)

The historic courtyard at this restaurant is so great they named the restaurant after it, and its Creole menu and the jazz brunch are staples of the local culinary scene. The brunch buffet’s selections change seasonally, but Court of Two Sisters made the traditional version of Bananas Foster part of its dinner and jazz brunch menus (it’s served with brandy and banana liquor over French vanilla ice cream). Other luscious selections New Orleans classics plus ice cream and New York-style cheesecake.

Croissant D’Or Patisserie (617 Ursulines Ave.)

This pretty, pastel coffee shop serves up house-made pastries, including almond croissants, fruit tarts, eclairs, crème brûlée, tiramisu, and specialty cakes.

Southern Candymakers (334 Decatur St.) 

Do you like fresh pralines? This classic southern confection makes for a great edible souvenir to take home, and Southern Candymakers makes small batches daily (you can also check out Loretta’s at the French Market).

Guide to Glam in the French Quarter – Prince Conti Hotel

Guide to Glam in the French Quarter - Prince Conti Hotel

Coco Chanel famously offered the following fashion advice: “Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off.” They’re words of wisdom to live by unless you’re in New Orleans. Things that might be considered over-the-top elsewhere — glitter, false eyelashes, rainbow-hued wigs — won’t turn any heads in the Big Easy.

And from bal masques to fundraiser galas, New Orleans offers endless opportunities to dress up. Step one in pulling together your look? Hair and makeup. Fortunately, the French Quarter boasts a wealth of talented stylists and makeup artists who are all too happy to get you glammed up. Here are a few that are just steps from the Prince Conti Hotel.

Fifi Mahony’s (934 Royal St.)

For full glam, Fifi Mahony’s is the place to be. You’ll know you’ve arrived when you pass a lavish assortment of custom Technicolor wigs displayed in the front window. Step inside this boutique, which houses a wig shop, as well as makeup and locally made accessories. Makeup artists can imbue you with natural-looking beauty or give you the glittery lips and false eyelashes of your wildest dreams.

Blo Blow Dry Bar (5530 Magazine St.)

You’d expect a blowout bar to be a master of hairstyling — and you’d be right. Blo delivers gorgeous hairstyles ranging from Hollywood curls to sleek side ponytails. Thanks to their expert combination of skills and products, a blowout can last a couple of days and still look great. Best of all, there’s no need to trek Uptown — Blo will send a stylist to you for an added fee.

Paris Parker (633 Carondelet St.)

Got a gala, black-tie event or public appearance on your itinerary? Go where New Orleanians go: the Paris Parker Salon (there are three locations in New Orleans, the one in CBD on Carondelet St. is closest to the hotel). The glossy Paris Parker is an Aveda concept salon that offers hair, makeup and nail services. It’s home to the most talented stylists in the city — and they’ll make sure you leave looking and feeling absolutely gorgeous.

Rocket Science (640 Elysian Fields Ave.)

Rocket Science is for you if you want amazing, cool-girl hair without the holier-than-thou attitude. The salon is inside a sunny, inviting double shotgun on Elysian Fields, near Washington Square Park in the Marigny, just steps away from the bustling Frenchmen Street. Cuts, color, perms, manicures and pedicures — they do it all, making Rocket Science the spot for a truly head-to-toe makeover.

Salon D (317 Burgundy St.)

Owner Dianna Thomas-Weder is known for her incredibly photogenic bridal makeup and hair, but she’s equipped to style patrons for any occasion. Salon D’s two storefronts are steps apart: at 317 Burgundy, you’ll find the hair salon, where airbrush makeup applications and spray tans also are on the service menu. Walk to 301 Burgundy St., Suite E, and finish off your look with a manicure and pedicure or leg wax. Also, their stylists will come to you for a travel fee.

Places to Hear Live Jazz in and Near Prince Conti Hotel

Places to Hear Live Jazz in and Near Prince Conti Hotel
Photo courtesy of Preservation Hall on Facebook

Around the turn of the 20th century, several cultural influences converged in New Orleans to create jazz. At Congo Square, free people of color and enslaved African-Americans performed bamboulas, calindas and more. Throughout the city, Spanish and French people marched in parades with brass instruments. Intermingling Caribbean influences brought a Latin tinge to the whole melee. Honed to perfection in Storyville brothels, the uniquely New Orleanian music became known as jazz when a 1916 Times-Picayune article referenced “jas bands.”

The spelling has changed, but you can still hear traditional live jazz — as well as its more experimental offshoots — at venues throughout the Vieux Carré. Here are a few to check out.

Bombay Club (830 Conti St.)

When former owner Richard Fiske took the wheel at Bombay Club in the early 2000s, jazz was scarce in the Quarter (except for Preservation Hall). Fiske aimed to make Bombay Club a live jazz destination on par with nightclubs of the 1940s. He succeeded at his task, and although he has since passed on, his legacy continues in the nightly lineup of jazz luminaries. There’s no better place to savor music alongside new Louisiana cuisine and cocktails, all in a comfortably luxurious atmosphere.

Preservation Hall (726 St. Peter St.)

There’s no food or drink for sale or public restrooms at this no-frills, all-ages venue (you can bring your own drinks). What you will find, though, is a bastion of traditional New Orleans jazz that has branched out in recent years to embrace performances by artists ranging from Mos Def to Foo Fighters. Grab a go-cup and get ready to sweat it out — a concert at Pres Hall is truly a New Orleans bucket-list item.

Fritzel’s European Jazz Club (733 Bourbon Street)

Fritzel’s is a great spot for live jazz, and it regularly dishes out plenty of old-school Dixieland. It’s calm and laid back in almost inverse proportion to much of the rest of Bourbon Street — a perfect stop if you’re feeling overwhelmed by all the crowds, or if you just want to listen to some good music.

The Spotted Cat (623 Frenchmen St.)

It’s raucous, it’s loud, it’s standing room only, and it’s one of the best places to throw down in New Orleans. This casual, petite Frenchmen Street venue has no cover (but there is a drink minimum, and the bar is cash-only). Traditional jazz, modern jazz, blues and funk — you’ll find it all at the Spotted Cat. If things get too hot and crowded, just step outside with your drink for a breather — chances are, you’ll find a brass band playing on the street.

Three Muses (536 Frenchmen St.)

Grab a seat at the bar or a tall bistro table, order Chef Daniel Esses’ tapas and one of the on-point house cocktails, and settle in for an intimate night of music. Curated by musician and Frenchmen Street fixture Sophie Lee, the nightly lineup includes Shotgun Jazz Band, Gal Holiday, Tom McDermott, and many others.

Blog Posts v2

The Best Desserts Near Prince Conti Hotel in the French Quarter

The Best Desserts Near Prince Conti Hotel in the French Quarter
Photo courtesy of The Bombay Club on Facebook

New Orleans is the city of over-indulgence, known for its cocktails and rich Creole cuisine. It’s also a great place for desserts. Doberge cake, bananas Foster, pralines and snoballs are just a few confections that were invented or perfected in the Big Easy. Looking for a place to satisfy your sweet tooth? Here are a few essential spots in the French Quarter — start with dessert-caliber breakfast and end with hot buttered rum. Life is sweet.

Arnaud’s (813 Bienville St.)

“Bread Pudding Fitzmorris” at this iconic and upscale Creole establishment is named after the city’s famous food critic and radio host of “The Food Show” on WWL Tom Fitzmorris. It’s not his recipe, but Fitzmorris praised this version of the dessert so much the restaurant owner named it after him. Antoine’s bread pudding is bread layered with thick slabs of custard and thinner layers of cinnamon and topped with rum-soaked raisins and warm Bourbon Sauce. It’s also offered as part of Arnaud’s excellent jazz brunch menu. Then, of course, there’s a whole slew of classic New Orleans desserts beyond bread pudding, like the old-fashioned pecan pie, bananas Foster, and café brûlot (hot spiced coffee flamed with brandy tableside).

Bombay Club (830 Conti St.)

Nightcap or dessert? A sweet cocktail such as Irish coffee, brandy milk punch or a grasshopper solves the age-old dilemma. There’s also bread pudding and house-made ice cream floats at this swanky live jazz club.

Brennan’s (417 Royal St.)

To this day, the original recipe Bananas Foster is Brennan’s most-ordered item. The restaurant reportedly flames 35,000 pounds of bananas for the famous dessert. The dramatic, tableside-flambéed original remains a standalone draw for the post-dinner crowd, visitors and locals alike, who flock to enjoy just the dessert, maybe with a cocktail, at the restaurant’s lush, iconic courtyard.

Café Conti (830 Conti St.)

Sweeten up breakfast with a Nutella and banana, peaches and cream or chocolate and strawberry crepe, among other flavors. Sometimes there’s also a sweet French toast of the day at this elegant little café.

Café du Monde (800 Decatur St.)

It wouldn’t be a trip to New Orleans without a beignet (or three). Deep-fried and dusted with powdered sugar, they’re a little bit of heaven served with a cup of café au lait.Court of Two Sisters (613 Royal St.)

The historic courtyard at this restaurant is so great they named the restaurant after it, and its Creole menu and the jazz brunch are staples of the local culinary scene. The brunch buffet’s selections change seasonally, but Court of Two Sisters made the traditional version of Bananas Foster part of its dinner and jazz brunch menus (it’s served with brandy and banana liquor over French vanilla ice cream). Other luscious selections New Orleans classics plus ice cream and New York-style cheesecake.

Croissant D’Or Patisserie (617 Ursulines Ave.)

This pretty, pastel coffee shop serves up house-made pastries, including almond croissants, fruit tarts, eclairs, crème brûlée, tiramisu, and specialty cakes.

Southern Candymakers (334 Decatur St.) 

Do you like fresh pralines? This classic southern confection makes for a great edible souvenir to take home, and Southern Candymakers makes small batches daily (you can also check out Loretta’s at the French Market).

Guide to Glam in the French Quarter – Prince Conti Hotel

Guide to Glam in the French Quarter - Prince Conti Hotel

Coco Chanel famously offered the following fashion advice: “Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off.” They’re words of wisdom to live by unless you’re in New Orleans. Things that might be considered over-the-top elsewhere — glitter, false eyelashes, rainbow-hued wigs — won’t turn any heads in the Big Easy.

And from bal masques to fundraiser galas, New Orleans offers endless opportunities to dress up. Step one in pulling together your look? Hair and makeup. Fortunately, the French Quarter boasts a wealth of talented stylists and makeup artists who are all too happy to get you glammed up. Here are a few that are just steps from the Prince Conti Hotel.

Fifi Mahony’s (934 Royal St.)

For full glam, Fifi Mahony’s is the place to be. You’ll know you’ve arrived when you pass a lavish assortment of custom Technicolor wigs displayed in the front window. Step inside this boutique, which houses a wig shop, as well as makeup and locally made accessories. Makeup artists can imbue you with natural-looking beauty or give you the glittery lips and false eyelashes of your wildest dreams.

Blo Blow Dry Bar (5530 Magazine St.)

You’d expect a blowout bar to be a master of hairstyling — and you’d be right. Blo delivers gorgeous hairstyles ranging from Hollywood curls to sleek side ponytails. Thanks to their expert combination of skills and products, a blowout can last a couple of days and still look great. Best of all, there’s no need to trek Uptown — Blo will send a stylist to you for an added fee.

Paris Parker (633 Carondelet St.)

Got a gala, black-tie event or public appearance on your itinerary? Go where New Orleanians go: the Paris Parker Salon (there are three locations in New Orleans, the one in CBD on Carondelet St. is closest to the hotel). The glossy Paris Parker is an Aveda concept salon that offers hair, makeup and nail services. It’s home to the most talented stylists in the city — and they’ll make sure you leave looking and feeling absolutely gorgeous.

Rocket Science (640 Elysian Fields Ave.)

Rocket Science is for you if you want amazing, cool-girl hair without the holier-than-thou attitude. The salon is inside a sunny, inviting double shotgun on Elysian Fields, near Washington Square Park in the Marigny, just steps away from the bustling Frenchmen Street. Cuts, color, perms, manicures and pedicures — they do it all, making Rocket Science the spot for a truly head-to-toe makeover.

Salon D (317 Burgundy St.)

Owner Dianna Thomas-Weder is known for her incredibly photogenic bridal makeup and hair, but she’s equipped to style patrons for any occasion. Salon D’s two storefronts are steps apart: at 317 Burgundy, you’ll find the hair salon, where airbrush makeup applications and spray tans also are on the service menu. Walk to 301 Burgundy St., Suite E, and finish off your look with a manicure and pedicure or leg wax. Also, their stylists will come to you for a travel fee.

Places to Hear Live Jazz in and Near Prince Conti Hotel

Places to Hear Live Jazz in and Near Prince Conti Hotel
Photo courtesy of Preservation Hall on Facebook

Around the turn of the 20th century, several cultural influences converged in New Orleans to create jazz. At Congo Square, free people of color and enslaved African-Americans performed bamboulas, calindas and more. Throughout the city, Spanish and French people marched in parades with brass instruments. Intermingling Caribbean influences brought a Latin tinge to the whole melee. Honed to perfection in Storyville brothels, the uniquely New Orleanian music became known as jazz when a 1916 Times-Picayune article referenced “jas bands.”

The spelling has changed, but you can still hear traditional live jazz — as well as its more experimental offshoots — at venues throughout the Vieux Carré. Here are a few to check out.

Bombay Club (830 Conti St.)

When former owner Richard Fiske took the wheel at Bombay Club in the early 2000s, jazz was scarce in the Quarter (except for Preservation Hall). Fiske aimed to make Bombay Club a live jazz destination on par with nightclubs of the 1940s. He succeeded at his task, and although he has since passed on, his legacy continues in the nightly lineup of jazz luminaries. There’s no better place to savor music alongside new Louisiana cuisine and cocktails, all in a comfortably luxurious atmosphere.

Preservation Hall (726 St. Peter St.)

There’s no food or drink for sale or public restrooms at this no-frills, all-ages venue (you can bring your own drinks). What you will find, though, is a bastion of traditional New Orleans jazz that has branched out in recent years to embrace performances by artists ranging from Mos Def to Foo Fighters. Grab a go-cup and get ready to sweat it out — a concert at Pres Hall is truly a New Orleans bucket-list item.

Fritzel’s European Jazz Club (733 Bourbon Street)

Fritzel’s is a great spot for live jazz, and it regularly dishes out plenty of old-school Dixieland. It’s calm and laid back in almost inverse proportion to much of the rest of Bourbon Street — a perfect stop if you’re feeling overwhelmed by all the crowds, or if you just want to listen to some good music.

The Spotted Cat (623 Frenchmen St.)

It’s raucous, it’s loud, it’s standing room only, and it’s one of the best places to throw down in New Orleans. This casual, petite Frenchmen Street venue has no cover (but there is a drink minimum, and the bar is cash-only). Traditional jazz, modern jazz, blues and funk — you’ll find it all at the Spotted Cat. If things get too hot and crowded, just step outside with your drink for a breather — chances are, you’ll find a brass band playing on the street.

Three Muses (536 Frenchmen St.)

Grab a seat at the bar or a tall bistro table, order Chef Daniel Esses’ tapas and one of the on-point house cocktails, and settle in for an intimate night of music. Curated by musician and Frenchmen Street fixture Sophie Lee, the nightly lineup includes Shotgun Jazz Band, Gal Holiday, Tom McDermott, and many others.

Getting Fit in the French Quarter

get-fit-french-quarter

New Orleans may be the city that care forgot but that doesn’t mean it has to be the city where your fitness regime is forgotten, too. Admittedly, it’s not always easy to stay disciplined, especially on vacation. Between beignets, jambalaya, eggs Benedict and bourbon milk punch, the Crescent City offers many delicious ways to fall off the wagon, diet-wise. But what most people don’t know is that the French Quarter also is host to several fantastic gyms, running paths and group exercise classes. If all else fails, just walking the Vieux Carré’s slate-paved sidewalks is a great way to plow through calories — strap on a pedometer and watch the steps add up alongside your sightseeing.

Craving a more intense burn? Here are some fantastic workouts that’ll take you into the vibrant, bustling heart of the French Quarter itself.

Running the Riverwalk

More than 16 million gallons of water roll down the mighty Mississippi River every minute — and with this sunny riverside run you’ll be getting in the flow right alongside them. The paved route is six blocks from Prince Conti Hotel’s front door. Looking for an energizing two-mile route? Make a right when you hit the river, jog through scenic Woldenberg Park until you approach the Aquarium of the Americas, then double back and run to the opposite end of the Moonwalk (a paved path named for former mayor Moon Landrieu).

For a more challenging, 5.5 mile route, tack on a jaunt down Crescent Park. You’ll exit the Moonwalk, make a right on Decatur Street, follow it to Esplanade Avenue, turn right on Esplanade, and follow the signs to a beautiful 1.4-mile linear park connecting the Bywater, Marigny and French Quarter. Run to the end and back, and by the time you return to your room, you’ll have racked up almost a 10K.

P.S. Forget to pack your sneakers? The Outlet Collection at Riverwalk, where you can snag a pair of discount designer running shoes, just steps away from this path.

New Orleans Athletic Club

A local staple since 1872, frequented by stars ranging from Tennessee Williams to Clark Gable, this opulent gym is worth a visit even if all you do is splash in the pool. (Where else will you find chandeliers, ballrooms, a library, and a full bar alongside top-of-the-line fitness equipment and weights?) The daily drop-in rate is $20 and includes admission to yoga and group exercise classes. Just bring your driver’s license and hotel room key to register.

The Sweat Social

For many, high-energy group exercise classes are a great motivator. (You’re not going to phone in your workout when an instructor is right there demanding more reps, right?) The Sweat Social is a group exercise class geared toward travelers, offering yoga, high-intensity interval training, mat Pilates, bodyweight strength exercises, kickboxing, and many other workouts for people of all fitness levels. Best of all, instructors encourage participants to mingle with team-building exercises, icebreakers, and raffles — so who knows, you might find a new drinking buddy to grab cocktails with after class. Scheduled on demand, classes are held in central locations in the French Quarter. Pricing varies depending on the type of class and group size.

Yoga at the Cabildo

This elegant building housed the Spanish colonial building in the 1700s, and now it’s a venue for yoga classes (also, a museum). For a double-dose of history and fitness all under one French mansard roof, check out Yoga at the Cabildo. Appropriate for all practice levels, classes take place in a sunny, high-ceilinged room overlooking Jackson Square from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. They are $15 or $10 for Friends of the Cabildo members.

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