5 Things to Do Indoors on a Summer Rainy Day in the French Quarter

Frequent downpours are common throughout the long summer season in Louisiana. Some are thunderous daylong storms, and others are brief afternoon showers quickly replaced by sunny skies (so quickly, in fact, that it may leave you wondering if it had rained at all).

While you definitely don’t want to be out when lightning strikes or the streets flood, summer showers are easy to wait out. And, rain or shine, the French Quarter will keep you fed and entertained.

Our suggestions, below, will help you easily kill a few hours in the air-conditioned indoors. All you need is a sense of adventure, patience, and an umbrella (and maybe rain boots because you DO NOT want to step into those puddles in the French Quarter in flip-flops).

1. Visit a museum

The Historic New Orleans Collection (THNOC) is spread over 10 historic buildings in the French Quarter. Though you may not want to tour the buildings in the rain, the Royal Street location (533 Royal St.) houses the main museum with a permanent exhibit on state history, plus rotating exhibits on history and art. Free admission.

The New Orleans Pharmacy Museum is a bargain at $10 and features a permanent collection of 19th-century surgical instruments, books, patent medicines, and locally excavated bottles. The museum occupies a two-story historic building, the site of the apothecary shop of Louis Joseph Dufilho, Jr., who was America’s first licensed pharmacist. The museum’s second floor features a sick room and physician’s study, and there’s a small yet lovely courtyard.

Consider heading to Jackson Square for two museums and a historic cathedral. Catch a mass or free concert (or just admire the interior during the quiet hours) at the St. Louis Cathedral. It’s flanked by The Cabildo and The Presbytère, which are run by the Louisiana State Museum and house a number of excellent exhibits ($10 admission to The Cabildo; $7 to The Presbytère). You’ll find many precious pieces of Louisiana history at the Cabildo, like a rare Napoleon death mask and a painting of Marie Laveau by Frank Schneider.

There are two excellent permanent exhibits at the Presbytere. You could get lost for hours in the “Mardi Gras: It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana” exhibit which details the history of Carnival traditions in Louisiana, including Cajun Courir de Mardi Gras, Zulu coconut throws, Rex floats, and spectacular costumes throughout the centuries. The “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond” exhibit documents the natural disaster and ongoing recovery.

These two aren’t technically museums but they’re so spectacular we’ll recommend them anyway. The Audubon Aquarium, a sprawling compound on the riverfront, will keep you and your family enthralled with its walk-through tunnel, otters, penguins, sea turtles, a stingray touch pool, and an expansive replica of an offshore oil rig submerged in 400,000 gallons of water. Next door, the Audubon Insectarium is packed with bug-centric interactive exhibits and features a spectacular butterfly garden.

2. Head to the mall

The Outlet Collection at Riverwalk and The Shops at Canal Place are a short walk away from each other. Both are self-contained, multi-storied indoor malls that could keep you shopping and eating for as long as your stamina holds up. The Riverwalk mall is an outlet with more than 75 retailers and restaurants, including Nordstrom Rack and Cafe du Monde. The Shops at Canal Place is home to Saks Fifth Avenue, Tiffany and Co., Anthropologie, and dozens of other upscale retailers. There’s a small food court upstairs.

3. See a movie

Prytania Theatres at Canal Place is located inside The Shops at Canal Place mall. It’s the second location of The Prytania Theatre, which is over 100 years old and is the longest continually operated theater in the South.

4. Take in a show

With the reopened Saenger and Joy theaters, Canal Street shines once again as a performing arts destination. See a Broadway show at the palatial Saenger, built in 1927 and restored in 2013 after staying vacant post-Katrina. Or catch a live music show or a national standup comedy act at the Joy Theater. This 1946 landmark started off as a movie theater and was gorgeously restored to its Art Deco glory.

Just off Jackson Square, Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre has called its St. Peter Street location home since 1922. Check out what’s playing this season at the famed playhouse during your visit.

5. Eat and drink!

There’s nothing more delicious than holing up with a cocktail and snack on a rainy day, and there’s obviously no shortage of options in the French Quarter. Some of the best bars and restaurants in the city offer great happy hour deals you won’t want to miss. The Bombay Club inside Prince Conti Hotel specializes in martinis and has more than 50 specialty cocktails on the menu. The daily happy hour (5-7 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday) features $3 beer and $4 wine, $5 cocktails, and small plates like roasted pork belly and alligator sausage.

Visiting New Orleans soon?

We’d love for you to stay with us! Take advantage of our specials, group rates, and best-rate guarantee for greater savings to spend on New Orleans famous cuisine and enjoy everything this magnificent city has to offer. Reserve your room today!

Also, consider booking a guided tour of the famous St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 to experience the hauntingly beautiful past of New Orleans. And, for easy, informative sightseeing, we recommend the City Sightseeing New Orleans city tour on the open-top, double-decker bus. It runs every 30 minutes through the Garden District, French Quarter, and CBD. You can hop on and off anytime!

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival 2024

It’s almost that time of year again — time to sip the iced tea, snack on crawfish Monica, and sway to the music of local and international musicians under the hot New Orleans sun. The New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, or Jazz Fest, is one of the most celebrated festivals in New Orleans and takes place every year during the last weekend of April and the first weekend in May. Jazz Fest has been around since 1970 and gets bigger and better every year.

During these two weekends, locals and out-of-towners get together to enjoy the culture of New Orleans with the various food, crafts, and performances that Jazz Fest has to offer. Contrary to the name, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival is more than just jazz music.

Various musical genres like hip-hop, zydeco, blues, tribal, and electronic music can all be heard live from Jazz Fest’s multiple stages. This year the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival will take place at its usual spot on the Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots (1751 Gentilly Blvd.) starting on Thursday, April 25, and ending on Sunday, May 5, 2024.

Some of the top headliners for the festival include The Rolling Stones, Foo Fighters, Queen Latifah, Heart, The Beach Boys, Jon Batiste, Neil Young Crazy Horse, The Killers, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Bonnie Raitt, Earth, Wind & Fire, and hundreds more. The music schedule is broken down by day in cubes with times for all the acts, which you can view here.

Of course, one of the best parts of Jazz Fest is the food. Some staples for food include Crawfish Monica, mango freezes, ya-ka-mein, snoballs, poboys, and much more. Here’s the list of 2024 food vendors.

What to Know About the 2024 Jazz Fest

  • Jazz Fest expanded to eight days this year, adding the opening day of Thursday, April 25, to the schedule.
  • Jazz Fest went cashless last year, and remains so. Ticket, food, beverage, craft, and merchandise booths no longer accept cash payments. If you come to the event with only cash, the Festival will offer two cash exchange booths near key vending locations so you can get a prepaid card for your cash.
  • This year, Jazz Fest features over 5,000 musicians across 14 stages.
  • The festival will be the largest one in its 53-year history. Eight is the most number of days for the event, and this year there will be the most food vendors and food items ever. And there also will be 260 art and craft vendors, the highest number ever.
  • Single-day tickets are $95 through April 24 and $105 at the gate. Tickets for children ages 2-10 are $5 at the gate.
  • “Locals Thursday” will be April 25 this year, with tickets at $50 for Louisiana residents.
  • This year Jazz Fest is introducing a 4-day GA+ weekend pass with access to an exclusive GA+ lounge with private restrooms, a full-service bar, and a shaded area to relax.
  • Tickets for Thursday, May 2, the day topped by The Rolling Stones, are sold out, including multiple-day passes.
  • The Rolling Stones headline Thursday, May 2, at 5 p.m. That day of the festival will operate normally until about 3:30 p.m. Then, when the Stones go on at 5 p.m., they’ll be the only band playing on the Fair Grounds.
  • Besides The Rolling Stones, the lineup includes Foo Fighters, Queen Latifah, Heart, The Beach Boys, Jon Batiste, Neil Young Crazy Horse, The Killers, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Bonnie Raitt, Earth, Wind & Fire, and hundreds more.
  • This year, Jazz Fest will celebrate Colombia’s musical and cultural diversity at the Expedia Cultural Exchange Pavilion. During the festival, 17 bands and a wide variety of artisans from throughout Colombia will present their sounds and traditions.
  • The Jazz & Heritage Gala kicks off Jazz Fest with the celebration of Louisiana music and cuisine on April 24 at Generations Hall (310 Andrew Higgins Blvd.).

Are You Attending Jazz Fest?

We’d love for you to stay with us! Take advantage of our specials, group rates, and best-rate guarantee for greater savings to spend on New Orleans famous cuisine and enjoy everything this magnificent city has to offer. Reserve your room today!

Also, consider booking a guided tour of the famous St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 to experience the hauntingly beautiful past of New Orleans. And, for easy, informative sightseeing, we recommend the City Sightseeing New Orleans city tour on the open-top, double-decker bus. It runs every 30 minutes through the Garden District, French Quarter, and CBD. You can hop on and off anytime!

Year at a Glance in New Orleans

In New Orleans, we honor just about every local food there is (and some drinks) with a festival, not to mention the packed party schedule that never lets up, from the Carnival to Super Sunday to the Saints football season. In other words, the Crescent City’s dance card is pretty much always full, even when the heat and humidity descend on the city in late spring and till mid-fall. Here are just a few highlights of all that’s going on in New Orleans year-round.

Spring

March 1 – May 31

Lovely weather and endless festivals continue this time of year with Wednesday at the Square; the Congo Square Rhythms Festival; the Tennessee Williams Literary Festival (don’t miss the “Stella!” shouting contest); the Mid-City’s own Bayou Boogaloo, held on the picturesque banks of Bayou St. John; the Freret Street Festival that’s getting bigger every year; and, of course, the two heavy hitters and the reason so many visitors come to New Orleans in the spring – the French Quarter Fest and Jazz Fest.

March also marks the annual return of NOLA on Tap Beer Fest at Lafreniere Park, the largest fundraiser for the Louisiana SPCA and the largest beer fest in the area, with more than 400 beer offerings from local and national breweries and homebrewers.

St. Patrick’s Day and Easter are subject to more celebration, with multiple parades and parties. Finally, the Mardi Gras Indians Super Sunday is a treasured tradition dating back to the 19th century and held on the Sunday closest to St. Joseph’s Day, which gets its own unique celebration across the Catholic churches and even private homes in the city with the beautifully appointed altars (the Italian-Sicilian contribution to New Orleans’ rich cultural tapestry).

Summer

June 1 – August 31

Want to cross an iconic New Orleans restaurant off your bucket list? There’s no time like Restaurant Week New Orleans, during which dozens of participating restaurants, from the James Beard luminaries to the new hotspots to the Creole grand dames offer set course menus at a deep discount. Also in June is another culinary fest, the New Orleans Wine & Food Experience, and the popular Louisiana Cajun Zydeco Festival, held at Louis Armstrong Park.

Summers here can be pretty hot and humid, but, still, the best restaurants and bars in town celebrate Tales of the Cocktail in July, and COOLinary New Orleans with prix fixe menus in August. You can also browse the galleries on the White Linen Night (or its cheeky cousin, the Dirty Linen Night).

The city comes to life for the Satchmo SummerFest and a slew of events over the Fourth of July and the Labor Day weekends, like Go 4th on the River, and the ESSENCE Festival at the Superdome. The French Market Creole Tomato Festival is one of the smaller fests to enjoy, and Running of the Bulls brings Encierro to New Orleans, except the bulls are the Big Easy Rollergirls. Finally, the Red Dress Run is a two-mile dash — that’s right — in a red dress for a charity.

Fall

September 1 – November 30

Cooler temps and the seemingly endless slew of food, drink and music festivals are on tap in the fall in New Orleans, starting over the Labor Day weekend with the massive and fabulous Southern Decadence, a popular festival that celebrates LGBTQIA+ with block parties, shows, and a parade.

October begins with the ever-expanding National Fried Chicken Festival at the Lakefront. Also, New Orleans throws its version of Oktoberfest over the three weekends at Deutsches Haus in Mid-City, to celebrate the city’s rich German history, followed by one of the best-attended art events in the city, Art for Art’s Sake.

Don’t miss the Crescent City Blues and BBQ Festival, the Tremé Fall Festival, and the New Orleans Film Festival, which is one of the largest film festivals in the South and is the longest-running festival of its kind in the state.

New Orleans does Halloween like no other city, so if you’re lucky to be visiting around that time, consider any of the balls, costume parties, parade, haunted tours, and a huge block party on Frenchmen Street! The kid-friendly parade called Krewe of Boo rolls through the French Quarter, courtesy of Kern Studios, and there are many more Halloween activities around the city happening in the couple weeks leading up to Halloween.

November brings more food festivals — the Oak Street Po-Boy Festival and the Beignet Festival at the New Orleans City Park Festival Grounds.

Thanksgiving at the Fair Grounds Race Course is a long-standing New Orleans tradition of turning out at the track on Thanksgiving Day to watch the opening-day races while sporting cocktails and fabulous hats. Next, there’s Bayou Classic, a fan fest, a parade, the battle of the bands, and, of course, the big game at the Superdome between Southern University and Grambling State University.

The beloved Celebration in the Oaks kicks off the holiday season with a dazzling holiday lights festival scattered throughout the 25 acres of the City Park, including the Botanical Garden, Storyland, and Carousel Gardens Amusement Park.

Winter

December 1 – February 28

There’s a whole slew of events that accompany Christmastime in the Crescent City, from bonfires on the Algiers levies to concerts at St. Louis Cathedral to the family-friendly NOLA Christmasfest to Reveillon menus at some of the city’s classic Creole restaurants. The streetcars are decked with wreaths, and the city is alight with the holiday sparkle, including at the annual LUNA Fête that brings large-scale light and sound installations to the Convention Center.

The New Year’s Eve celebrations in New Orleans include the Dick Clark Rockin’ New Year’s Eve at the historic JAX Brewery in the French Quarter, with a fleur-de-lis drop at midnight to the countdown on Jackson Square, quite a few balcony parties on and around Bourbon Street, and the fireworks over the Mississippi River.

The first day of the carnival season known as Twelfth Night, or the Epiphany, kicks off every year with three parades — Phunny Phorty Phellows ride the streetcar from Uptown to Canal Street and back, plus the walking Krewe of Joan of Arc in the French Quarter, and the Société Des Champs Elysée.

Mardi Gras season culminates every year on Fat Tuesday anytime between February 3 and March 9 (March 4 in 2025). There’s not enough room to describe one of the great spectacles in the world, but keep up with the parade schedule to at least get started on how to do Mardi Gras in New Orleans.

February closes with an enormous public Tet celebration in New Orleans East to celebrate the Lunar New Year (did you know that New Orleans is home to one of the largest Vietnamese diaspora communities in the country?), and Valentine’s Day – which isn’t unique to New Orleans but is nevertheless good to celebrate in one of the most romantic cities in the world.

As you can see, we have a lot going on all year round! No matter when you visit, take advantage of French Market Inn specials, group rates, and best-rate guarantee for greater savings to spend on New Orleans famous French Quarter cuisine and enjoying everything this magnificent city has to offer. Reserve your room today!

Also, consider booking a guided tour of the famous St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 to experience the hauntingly beautiful past of New Orleans. And, for easy, informative sightseeing, we recommend the City Sightseeing New Orleans city tour on the open-top, double-decker bus. It runs every 30 minutes through the Garden District, French Quarter, and CBD. You can hop on and off anytime!

Best Live Music Venues Near French Market Inn

Image courtesy of Preservation Hall on Facebook

New Orleans is a music city, and if you’re staying in the French Quarter you are in luck as you can walk to many venues that dish out excellent, world-class live music nightly, often for a low cover. Sometimes it’s even free — all you need to do is walk around and catch a band on a street corner.

Also, there’s no better place for live music than the Marigny Triangle. Situated between Esplanade Avenue and Elysian Fields, this wedge-shaped neighborhood is bisected by Frenchmen Street, a pedestrian-friendly strip of music clubs, bars, restaurants, and an art market, some of which don’t get going until after 10 p.m. The vibe is a giant block party, and you can easily walk there from the hotel.

So, here’s just a sliver of where to check out the city’s robust live music culture near the French Market Inn.

In the French Quarter

21st Amendment Bar at La Louisiane

725 Iberville Street

Prohibition-era 21st Amendment Bar is located just a half-block off Bourbon Street. The bar takes its name from the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which repealed the 18th Amendment creating Prohibition (the ban on alcohol production and sales) in 1920. The space was originally a hotel and restaurant called La Louisiane when it was established in 1933; the same year, Prohibition ended. Black-and-white images of mobsters adorn the walls, and inventive craft cocktails abound.

Fritzel’s European Jazz Club

733 Bourbon Street

Fritzel’s is a great spot for live jazz, and it regularly dishes out plenty of old-school Dixieland. It’s calm and laid back in almost inverse proportion to much of the rest of Bourbon Street — a perfect stop if you’re feeling overwhelmed by all the crowds, or if you just want to listen to some good music.

New Orleans Street Music

Royal Street, Jackson Square, Bourbon Street)

You don’t have to buy a cocktail or pay a cover to hear great jazz. Playing on the street is a New Orleans tradition, and many successful music careers have started that way. You might catch a band on the corners throughout the Quarter nightly, especially on Bourbon and Royal, plus on Jackson Square. Frenchmen Street in the Marigny also hosts impromptu performances nightly. Drop a tip in a jar, and enjoy.

Preservation Hall

726 St. Peter Street

There’s no food or drink for sale or public restrooms at this no-frills, all-ages venue (you can bring your own drinks). What you will find, though, is a bastion of traditional New Orleans jazz that has branched out in recent years to embrace performances by artists ranging from Mos Def to Foo Fighters. Grab a go-cup and get ready to sweat it out — a concert at Pres Hall is truly a New Orleans bucket list item.

The Bombay Club

830 Conti Street

When former owner Richard Fiske took the wheel at Bombay Club in the early 2000s, jazz was scarce in the Quarter (except for Preservation Hall). Fiske aimed to make The Bombay Club a live jazz destination on par with nightclubs of the 1940s. He succeeded at his task, and although he has since passed on, his legacy continues in the nightly lineup of jazz luminaries. There’s no better place to savor music alongside new Louisiana cuisine and cocktails, all in a comfortably luxurious atmosphere.

On Frenchmen Street

The Maison

508 Frenchmen Street

A music club that triples as a restaurant and bar. It’s three-level, with multiple stages where you can find drag, burlesque, and live music of many genres. The menu is primarily New Orleans classics, a house burger, and sandwich platters.

Bamboula’s

514 Frenchmen Street

Here, you’ll find casual New Orleans fare like po-boys and jambalaya. The no-cover eclectic live music seven days a week is another draw.

Blue Nile

532 Frenchmen Street

One of the longest-standing clubs on Frenchmen Street is a must for live jazz and local brass. On any given night, you can catch a performance by the city’s top musicians like Kermit Ruffins and Big Sam’s Funky Nation. It’s also a great spot to see the Mardi Gras Indians do a show.

Three Muses

536 Frenchmen Street

Grab a seat at the bar or a tall bistro table, order Chef Daniel Esses’ tapas and one of the on-point house cocktails, and settle in for an intimate night of music. Curated by musician and Frenchmen Street fixture Sophie Lee, the nightly lineup includes Shotgun Jazz Band, Gal Holiday, Tom McDermott, and many others.

d.b.a.

618 Frenchmen Street

Since this live music venue opened its doors in 2000, d.b.a. has hosted hundreds of live acts. The bar features a broad selection of beer and spirits, and the music plays nightly. Tin Men and John Boutte perform there regularly.

Marigny Brasserie

640 Frenchmen Street

The casual, live music venue at the end of Frenchmen offers an elevated Cajun/Creole menu, hand-crafted cocktails, a good wine list, and local draft beer plus live big-band music.

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro

626 Frenchmen Street

Snug Harbor is a sit-down ticketed music venue that is home to local and touring heavyweights of traditional and modern jazz (such as a weekly show by Ellis Marsalis). For over 30 years, Snug Harbor has provided the best in live jazz and great regional cuisine. Snug Harbor is located in three rooms of a renovated 1800s storefront a dining room, a bar, and a music room.

The Spotted Cat

623 Frenchmen Street

It’s raucous, it’s loud, it’s standing room only, and it’s one of the best places to throw down in New Orleans. This casual, petite Frenchmen Street venue doles out traditional jazz, modern jazz, blues, and funk. If things get too hot and crowded, just step outside with your drink for a breather — chances are, you’ll find a brass band playing on the street.

Remember, you can walk to all these venues from your hotel! Take advantage of the French Market Inn specials, group rates, and best-rate guarantee for greater savings to spend on New Orleans famous French Quarter cuisine and enjoying everything this magnificent city has to offer. Reserve your room today!

 

 

French Quarter on a Budget

The streetcar is a reliable transportation option and only costs $1.25

The French Quarter can easily part you with your hard-earned cash in one evening if you are splurging on the swanky and the high-end (a dinner at Galatoire’s and drinks at French 75, for example), but, just as easily, you can have a great time on a limited budget. There’s a wealth of free attractions, reasonably priced food, low covers for live music, and happy hours with craft cocktails under $10. Here are some suggestions on how to do the French Quarter on a budget.

Have Breakfast at Cafe du Monde

If you hit Cafe du Monde (800 Decatur st.) in the morning, you’ll probably have to wait in line. But it’s worth the wait for a breakfast treat New Orleanians have been savoring since 1862. Order a plate of three fresh-from-the-fryer beignets dusted with powdered sugar, and dip them into a steaming hot cup of cafe au lait. Though light as air, beignets are surprisingly filling, and taste even better when you’re listening to live jazz while breezes waft off the nearby Mississippi.

Cost: about $6, plus tip.

Walk Along the Mississippi River, and Take a Trip on the Algiers Ferry

Strolling the banks of the Mississippi River is both delightful and free. And you don’t have to spring for a pricey ticket on a paddlewheel boat to cruise the river. It costs just $2 to board the Algiers ferry to the West Bank, which leaves from the foot of Canal Street, near the Aquarium of the Americas. You’ll enjoy sweeping views of the city’s skyline, and the towering spires of St. Louis Cathedral.

About five minutes later, you’ll dock at Algiers Point, a historic neighborhood with expansive views of the Crescent City along the Mississippi River levee. Reboard the ferry for another $2 when you’re ready to leave, and get back off where you started.

Cost: $4 round trip.

Grab a Sandwich to Go for Lunch

Central Grocery (923 Decatur St.) invented the muffuletta. It rivals the po-boy as the city’s most iconic sandwich. Layered with sliced Italian deli meats, rich provolone cheese, and hot and spicy olive salad, muffulettas are served on locally baked seeded buns and are big enough to feed two people. If it’s just you, opt for the half-sandwich.

Another great option, Verti Marte (1201 Royal St.) has dozens of sandwiches on its extensive menu, including the specialty gems like a vegetarian Green Giant and the meat-and-shrimp laden All That Jazz. Pro tip: Bring your lunch to the Moonwalk for a riverside picnic that will more than fill you up for the day.

Cost: $15.25 for a half of muffuletta; Verti Marte prices vary.

Walk Around and Window Shop

One of the best streets for window shopping is Royal Street, its pedestrian-only part in particular. There you’ll find dozens of antique, jewelry and vintage shops touting their stunning wares in their windows.

We’re especially impressed with a trove of priceless antiques worth a fortune at M.S. Rau Antiques (630 Royal St.), but it doesn’t cost a dime to drool over exquisite Victorian music boxes, dazzling diamond-encrusted brooches and elaborate player pianos. And Rau is just one of the many shops brimming with oddities and treasures on Royal Street.

The architecture isn’t shabby either, so enjoy all the wrought iron. Cap off an afternoon of aspirational window shopping by trying on one of the phantasmagorical wigs at Fifi Mahony’s (934 Royal St.).

Another fun street to walk is Chartres Street, which is studded with boutiques and interesting local stores. If you walk from Canal Street toward Esplanade Avenue, Chartres Street will lead you right to Jackson Square, where there’s usually a lot going on: street performances, brass bands, art displayed for sale, fortune telling, and just lots of local color and joie de vivre. Soak it up!

Cost: Free.

Hit a Happy Hour

New Orleans is a drinking town and boasts some of the best happy hours in the country. Lagniappe: many offer budget-priced small bites that can easily serve as an early dinner. These are just three to pick from, but really, the options are expansive.

Kingfish (337 Chartres St.)

Live like a king (on a budget) Monday through Friday from 2 to 5 p.m., when you can drink draft beer ($4), wine ($6), or specialty cocktails ($7) while noshing on $9 small plates like duck and andouille gumbo and Louisiana crawfish bread.

Saint John (1117 Decatur St.)

You can’t go wrong with upscale Creole cuisine when the bar bites are $7 and the libations are $5. This French Quarter newcomer is garnering accolades left and right, and this is your chance to find out why.

The Bombay Club (830 Conti St.)

If you’re staying at the Prince Conti Hotel, one of the best and most leisurely happy hours in the Quarter is right downstairs at The Bombay Club, where it runs from 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Wash down shareables and bites like Natchitoches meat pies and Ploughman’s Board with a couple of beers ($3), glasses of wine ($4), or specialty cocktails ($5). Cost: Depends on how heartily you imbibe, but about $20 plus tip for two drinks and two apps buys a nice buzz and something in your belly to offset it.

Want to be close to al these places and attractions? Book your stay at our beautiful French Market Inn! Our historic hotel is located in the heart of the New Orleans French Quarter, close to a multitude of popular New Orleans bars, restaurants and landmarks.

10 Iconic New Orleans Brunch Dishes You Must Try in the French Quarter

Image courtesy of The Original Pierre Maspero’s on Facebook

Brunch is usually meant to be a lingering, boozy affair, but New Orleans takes it to a new level with a slew of jazz brunches, classic cocktails, and decadent Creole fare. Many local restaurants offer special weekend brunch menus, often accompanied by live music, and seat as late as 3 p.m. Bottomless mimosas and build-your-own-Bloody-Mary bars are a thing, and your eggs and waffles will arrive at the table covered with decadent sauces, Gulf seafood, and other deliciousness.

From the iconic Creole grand dames to contemporary wonders helmed by award-winning chefs, you can easily find tasty renditions of New Orleans and southern staples on many local brunch menus. Here are our suggestions for the French Quarter and nearby.

1. Biscuits and Gravy

We don’t need to explain this Southern classic, which you can spot on many menus of the French Quarter restaurants, from downhome diners to the white-tablecloth veterans alike.

Where to try it: A locally owned mini-chain with one location in the French Quarter, Ruby Slipper‘s buttermilk biscuits and gravy also come with eggs, bacon, and fried green tomato. You can also add chicken to your order. This Southern staple is also on the menu of the CBD-based Willa Jean (near the French Quarter, and a must if you’re a biscuit enthusiast). Willa Jean also doubles as a bakery, and the biscuit is served four different ways (look for “The Biscuit Situation” section in the menu).

2. Breakfast Po-Boy

The egg-and-cheese version of this local staple, a breakfast po-boy also comes with smoked sausage, ham, and veggies. It’s served on French bread, of course.

Where to try it: The version served at Stanley is eggs Benedict and bacon, and it’s served all day. To-go or delivery-only Verti Marte has whopping nine choices of the eggs-cheese-bacon-ham-sausage combos, all served on French bread.

3. Chicken and Waffles

Before avocado toast and bottomless mimosas began showing up on the brunch menus everywhere, there were chicken and waffles. Simple, satisfying, and as Southern as they come, this dish can be found all over the French Quarter.

Where to try it: The standouts include The Original Pierre Maspero’s (Maspero’s version features a honey Tabasco glaze) and the fluffy buttermilk waffles at Creole House.

4. Crabmeat Cheesecake

Don’t let the name confuse you — this is not a dessert but rather a savory dish — a blend of fresh crabmeat, pecan crust, mushroom sauté, and Creole meuniere.

Where to try it: At the Palace Cafe, which is part of the Brennan’s group of restaurants and has one of the few sidewalk dining options in the Quarter. Crabmeat Cheesecake is Palace Cafe’s signature dish, and you can find it on the restaurant’s brunch menu along with other New Orleans lunch and brunch mainstays like shrimp remoulade.

5. Eggs Sardou

Eggs Sardou isn’t as ubiquitous as, say, eggs Benedict, but this Creole dish is nevertheless a New Orleans brunch staple. Like eggs Benedict, eggs Sardou are poached, and served over steamed artichoke bottoms and topped with hollandaise sauce.

Where to try: At Antoine‘s popular jazz brunch, along with its famous oysters Rockefeller and shrimp remoulade. Feeling adventurous? Try eggs Rossini, also on the menu: the poached egg comes with foie gras mousse crostini, a small beef filet, and Madeira hollandaise.

6. French Toast/Pain Perdu

Pain Perdu means “lost bread,” referring to the dish’s ability to resurrect stale and otherwise lost to most purposes bread. For this version of French toast French bread is soaked in eggs and milk and then fried (sometimes deep-fried) or grilled, which results in a crisp and buttery exterior and a soft and custardy inside.

Where to try it: Chef Scott Boswell created a very popular Bananas Foster French toast for Stanley’s breakfast and brunch menus (again, served all day). The battered French bread is topped with sliced bananas, toasted walnuts and Foster sauce, and served with vanilla ice cream. This is of course a nod to the classic Bananas Foster dessert, which originated at New Orleans’ own Brennan’s Restaurant and is still its most-ordered item.

The Ruby Slipper hits all the right notes when it comes to brunch mainstays but with distinctly Louisiana twists. This brunch queen has a version of Bananas Foster pain perdu that fits right in with eggs cochon and the acclaimed house specialty, BBQ shrimp and grits. It’s made with French bread, of course, and is served with rum-flambéed bananas and applewood-smoked bacon.

7. Gumbo

One of Louisiana’s most famous dishes, excellent gumbo is easy to find in the French Quarter — it just depends on whether you like your gumbo with darker or lighter roux, and with meat or seafood (or laden with both). Most restaurants include at least two versions on the menu, the meat and the seafood, and tend not to stray too far from the classic Cajun and Creole recipes.

Where to try it: The Gumbo Shop serves seafood and okra gumbo that is thick with shrimp and crabmeat; a smoky chicken and andouille sausage gumbo; and even gumbo z’herbes, a rarely-seen vegetarian gumbo made with greens. Cup-sized portions are available for easy sampling. Gumbo Ya-Ya, a house specialty at Mr. B’s Bistro, is a Cajun country-style gumbo made with a dark roux, lots of Creole spices, chicken, and Andouille sausage. (Pair it with Mr. B’s legendary BBQ shrimp, which comes with French bread for dipping, and a bib).

8. Jambalaya

This flavorful one-pot, rice-based dish is right up there with gumbo when it comes to well-deserved international fame, and can be found in many French Quarter restaurants. This staple traditionally incorporates stock, meat, seafood, long-grain rice, and vegetables (like the “holy trinity” also used in gumbo — bell pepper, onion and celery). The main distinction is that the Creole version has tomatoes and the Cajun recipe does not.

Where to try it: One of the best versions you can find in the French Quarter is served at a local watering hole on a busy block of Decatur St., Coop’s Place. Coop’s Cajun-style rabbit and sausage jambalaya can be upgraded to “supreme” by adding shrimp and tasso, a spicy Cajun ham smoked on premises. No reservations are accepted at this casual joint, and no one under 18 is allowed inside because of the video poker machines.

To sample jambalaya in a more upscale setting, try the version cooked up at Napoleon House, which is laden with seafood in a dark roux. Consider pairing it with the restaurant’s famous muffuletta and washing it down with its signature drink, Pimm’s Cup. And the New Orleans Creole Cookery has a vegetarian version, not something many restaurants offer.

9. Shrimp and Grits

This iconic Louisiana dish is served on many lunch and brunch menus in the French Quarter, with local chefs often adding their own twist.

Where to try it: Mr.B’s Bistro wraps its shrimp in bacon, and Tujaque’s offers the classic version with New Orleans-style BBQ sauce and stone-ground grits.

10. Turtle Soup

This Louisiana classic is considered a delicacy in many cultures across the globe. The silky Creole version, served with a touch of sherry (and sometimes with grated or chopped egg, and more sherry tableside), can be found in many classic New Orleans restaurants that serve Creole dishes, including, famously, Commander’s Palace and Brennan’s.

Where to try it: You can enjoy the old-world Creole decadence, along with its legendary turtle soup, at Arnaud’s Sunday jazz brunch, which features Dixieland and a prix fixe menu. The Court of Two Sisters also offers turtle soup on its everyday jazz brunch menu, along with a sumptuous spread that includes Louisiana classics like grits and grillades, a seafood buffet, and a carving station. Want a view of Jackson Square with your turtle soup? Muriel’s got you covered with its elegant weekend brunch, accompanied by the sounds of live jazz music and a Ramos gin fizz or a Sazerac.

Are you visiting New Orleans soon? Book your stay at our beautiful French Market Inn! Our historic hotel is located in the heart of the New Orleans French Quarter, close to a multitude of popular New Orleans bars, restaurants and landmarks.

Girl Trip: A Day in the French Quarter

If you’re in town traveling with the women you love, the French Quarter makes for a great setting. It’s packed with interesting boutiques and great bars and restaurants, and easy to explore on foot. Many establishments that are open late are within walking distance from the hotel, and most other areas of the city are only a short car or streetcar ride away. Here are some of our French Quarter picks you can hit on your girl trip to New Orleans.

Morning

Start the day at PJ’s Coffee, conveniently located inside the hotel on Decatur St. You can sip on the hotel’s balcony, enjoying the view of the street and the Mississippi River, or grab a hot, iced, or frozen coffee beverage and a treat before heading out. The coffeeshop opens at 6 a.m. and has free wifi.

Want to cross beignets off your food bucket list? The always-open Cafe Du Monde (800 Decatur St.) is nearby, at the historic French Market (1100 N. Peters St.), where it’s been since 1862. Pair your sugar-dusted slices of heaven with a cup of cafe au lait, and call it breakfast. Want to linger over your croissant? Another classic gem, the French-style patisserie Croissant D’Or (617 Ursulines Ave), is a short walk away.

Next, why not explore the French Market and the Riverfront? The market has been around for over three centuries and now packs a massive flea market and food court, both good places to shop for souvenirs and gifts to take home. And the Riverfront offers a great view of the Mississippi River and a leisurely stroll among public art and to the lively soundtrack of the boats going by.

Next, stroll to Jackson Square to explore St. Louis Cathedral, catch a brass band, and have your fortune told. The fortune tellers set up shop right outside the cathedral, at any time of day or night, and can divine your future with tarot cards, bones, and runes.

Afternoon

Ready for lunch? There are many options, of course, but we won’t steer you wrong with the prix fixe lunch specials with bottomless mimosas at Antoine’s Restaurant (713 St. Louis St.).

Do you have any foodies in your group? Chef Susan Spicer’s flagship Bayona Restaurant (430 Dauphine St.), housed in a 200-year-old Creole cottage with a lovely courtyard, is always cooking up something impressive with seasonal ingredients.

Many French Quarter-centered girl trips make a pitstop at Spa Atlantis (536 Bienville St.). Whether you indulge yourselves with a full-glam package or a quick massage, it’s a great way to relax and recharge before you resume exploring the Quarter.

Ready for some power shopping? Quirky and affordable boutiques like Hemline (609 Chartres St.) dot Chartres Street between Canal Street and Jackson Square. Shop the original vintage-inspired designs that flatter every body size and shape at Trashy Diva (537 Royal St.). Another must-stop is Fifi Mahony’s (934 Royal St.), where you can try wigs in every style and color and glitz up with makeup and accessories.

New Orleans takes happy hour to a new level, so, from the Old World landmarks to watering holes, you have tons of options. To sip in style, try Hermes Bar at Antoine’s (725 St. Louis St.). Mardi Gras memorabilia is displayed in glass cases, and the house’s original Oysters Rockefeller is a must. If you go to French 75 (813 Bienville), order the namesake drink, of course. The go-to for Pimm’s Cup is the historic Napoleon House (500 Chartres St.), which has featured this signature drink for decades.

We also recommend The Bombay Club (830 Conti St.), tucked away in a carriage house at the Prince Conti Hotel. It has the most extensive martini menu in town, live music, and an interesting bar menu.

Are you celebrating something on your trip to New Orleans? This calls for champagne! Effervescence (1036 N. Rampart St.) is the go-to then as the only champagne bar in the French Quarter, and The Roost Bar at Brennan’s Restaurant (417 Royal St.) has one of the best champagne happy hours around.

Evening

There is not enough room to even start discussing all of the numerous dining options that await around every corner in the French Quarter. Depending on your budget and culinary preferences, you shouldn’t have any trouble finding a perfect spot for your group. Ask our concierge for recommendations, too. And, of course, if it’s a popular and/or high-end restaurant, we advise making a reservation in advance.

We know, it can be tacky and loud, but Bourbon Street can be a lot of rambunctious fun with its giant drinks, karaoke pitstops, people-watching, and non-stop action. So, give it a try at least for a few blocks.

For live music, head across Esplanade Avenue to the music corridor of Frenchmen Street in Faubourg Marigny. There will be music pouring out of every bar and on street corners, and the fun goes on well into the night. Our favorites include the Blue Nile (532 Frenchmen St.), The Spotted Cat Music Club (623 Frenchmen St.), and d.b.a. (618 Frenchmen St.).

Not ready to call it a night? Hit the dance floor at Santos (1135 Decatur St.), which is open till 5 a.m.

There you have it, and this is just a starting point. Happy exploring!

Are you in town for a bachelorette party? Book your stay at our beautiful French Market Inn! Our historic hotel is located in the heart of the New Orleans French Quarter, close to a multitude of popular New Orleans bars, restaurants and landmarks.

 

 

Shopping Near the French Market Inn

The Shops at JAX Brewery, French Quarter, New Orleans. Image courtesy of The Shops at JAX Brewery on Facebook

You’re in luck when it comes to shopping options near French Market Inn, as there are three malls nearby, and the area is packed with boutiques (try Chartres Street) and souvenir shops (head down Decatur Street toward Esplanade Avenue when you leave the hotel).

The renovated JAX Brewery, a multi-story historic landmark packed with stores and restaurants, is only a block away. And you will definitely want to check out the upscale Shops at Canal Place, also just blocks away from the French Market Inn. You may also want to spend some time at the sprawling outlet shopping mall the Riverwalk.

Across the street from French Market Inn, you’ll find H&MUrban OutfittersVans, and Sephora, all next to one another. If you walk toward Canal Street, you’ll find one of the best bookstores in the city, Beckham’s Bookshop (228 Decatur Street).

For unique, well-priced local art and souvenirs, try the French Market. The French Market’s Shops at the Colonnade is a strip of shops also worth a visit if you’re shopping for souvenirs (including the edible kind, like pralines or a beignet mix) or local specialties.

Nearby, the eclectic David’s Found Objects (1319 Decatur Street) has quite a collection of costume jewelry and vintage glass Mardi Gras beads. To stock up on New Orleans-themed ornaments and every possible take on a fleur-de-lis, check out the Christmas-themed Santa’s Quarters.

For vintage-inspired clothing, shoes and accessories try Trashy Diva and Dollz & Dames.

If you are visiting New Orleans and want to stay in the French Quarter, book your stay at our beautiful hotel, the French Market Inn! This historic hotel is close to a multitude of popular New Orleans shopping destinations, bars, restaurants, and landmarks.

Uniquely New Orleans Cocktails in the French Quarter

Café Brûlot at Arnaud’s. Image courtesy of Arnaud’s & the French 75 Bar on Facebook

From the eye-openers like milk punch to the decadent absinthe frappe, many of the cocktails you came to know and love (or can’t wait to taste while visiting) were either invented or perfected here. The rich and distinctive cocktail culture of New Orleans is full of history, lore and speculation, perfectly complementing the delicious melting pot of our cuisine. Here’s to the unique concoctions you can find in New Orleans, and the best places in the French Quarter to try them.

Absinthe Frappe

What’s in it: Absinthe, sugar, mint, and soda over crushed ice.

Where to try it: The Old Absinthe House, which invented this drink in 1874.

This deceivingly refreshing mint-green concoction packs a punch, and there’s no better place to chase the green fairy than at its historic birthplace, the Old Absinthe House, which has seen the likes of Mark Twain and Oscar Wilde among its patrons.

Cafe Brûlot

What’s in it: Brandy, Curaçao, Grand Marnier or Cointreau, hot, strong black coffee, sugar cubes, orange peel, lemon peel, cinnamon (sticks), cloves.

Where to try it: Antoine’s (where it was supposedly invented), Arnaud’s, Galatoire’s.

This signature after-dinner drink is way more than just coffee — a lot goes into the presentation, which includes setting brandy and Curaçao on fire and ladling the flaming liquid over a spiral of orange peel. In a nutshell, Café Brûlot involves “burnt brandy,” and it is said to have been invented at Antoine’s in the 1880s and originally made tableside in an ornate copper bowl.

French 75

What’s in it: Champagne, lemon juice, gin, simple syrup.

Where to try it: Arnaud’s French 75.

Invented during World War I by a New York bartender, this cocktail has become a mainstay across New Orleans barrooms. The version at its namesake bar, attached to the iconic Creole grand dame of restaurants, Arnaud’s, is made with Courvoisier VS, sugar, lemon juice, and Moët & Chandon.

Frozen Irish Coffee

What’s in it: Strong black coffee, cooled; sweetened cream, Irish Whiskey, chocolate.

Where to try it: Molly’s at the Market, Erin Rose.

Frozen Irish coffee was not invented in New Orleans, but it’s on many menus of the French Quarter bars. Molly’s at the Market and Erin Rose both have become known for their Irish coffee.

Grasshopper

What’s in it: Crème de menthe, crème de cacao, heavy cream.

Where to try it: Tujague’s.

The Grasshopper Cocktail is a sweet, mint-flavored after-dinner drink that derives its name from the green color lent by crème de menthe. It was created by Philibert Guichet, the former proprietor of Tujague’s Restaurant in the French Quarter. He created the cocktail for a drink competition in New York City in 1919, and it took the second prize. Ever since, the cocktail has been served at Tujague’s and other fine establishments across New Orleans and the country.

Hand Grenade

What’s in it: Gin, vodka, rum, melon liquor.

Where to try it: Any of the five French Quarter outposts of the “New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink” inventor, the Tropical Isle.

The Hand Grenade is truly a Bourbon Street original, and it’s sold frozen or on the rocks exclusively through the Tropical Isle. You’ll see the memorable neon-colored, hand grenade-shaped containers clutched by many a passerby in the Quarter. You might also spot the drink’s own mascot, dressed in an inflatable grenade costume, bouncing along Bourbon Street.

The drink first debuted at New Orleans World Fair in 1984. You can take home the Tropical Isle’s Hand Grenade mix, which is a melon-flavored blend of liqueurs and “secret ingredients.”

Hurricane

What’s in it: Rum (both dark and light), lemon juice, passion fruit syrup, or juice. Might include simple syrup, grenadine and orange juice, and (in fancier establishments) such garnishes as pineapple leaves and slices, maraschino cherries, or slices of orange. Served in a tall, signature “hurricane” glass.

Where to try it: The bar that gets the credit for inventing this fruity, bright-red concoction, Pat O’Brien’s.

Pat O’Brien ran a speakeasy in the 600 block of St. Peter street in the French Quarter until the repeal of Prohibition. Then he opened a bar in 1933 at the 718 St. Peter street location. During the war, domestic liquor was scarce but rum was freely flowing from the Caribbean islands via the Mississippi River. The long story of finding the right mix of juices and rum short, passion fruit has won as a mixer of choice, and the new (and very potent) drink was served in a glass shaped like a hurricane lamp. These days you can take home of a bottle of Pat O’Brien’s signature hurricane mix and a souvenir hurricane glass.

Milk Punch

What’s in it: Brandy or bourbon, milk, sugar, vanilla extract, with nutmeg sprinkled on top. Served cold.

Where to try it: Brennan’s or Galatoire’s, but you can find it all over the city, and several places have their own take on this eye-opener.

Milk Punch is a Sunday brunch and winter holidays staple in New Orleans. It’s enjoyed a revival since 1901, when it appeared in The Original Picayune Creole Cook Book’s first edition. It might remind you of eggnog, minus the eggs. And don’t be fooled by its creamy and sweet nature — this boozy milkshake packs a punch.

Pimm’s Cup

What’s in it: Pimm’s #1, lemonade, topped up with 7up and garnished with cucumber.

Where to try it: Napoleon House.

Pimm’s Cup was introduced to New Orleans at the famous Napoleon House in the 1940s. When Emperor Napoleon was captured by the British in 1815 and exiled to the Island of St. Helena, the Mayor of New Orleans famously offered Napoleon sanctuary. This was not to be, but Napoleon House persisted, first being in the Impasto family for 101 years and then being purchased by the Brennan family in 2015. Pimm’s Cup, at only 50 proof, was introduced to New Orleans in the 1940s, with a slightly different recipe than its U.K. counterpart. This gin-based, refreshing aperitif has become a summertime favorite in the American South for obvious reasons.

Ramos Gin Fizz

What’s in it: Gin, heavy cream or milk, lemon juice, lime juice, simple syrup, powdered sugar, orange flower water, egg white, and club soda (to top).

Where to try it: The birthplace of the cocktail, the Carousel Bar & Lounge.

This frothy floral cocktail was named after the bartender Henry Ramos who is said to have invented it in 1888. It was also reportedly the favored drink of Huey Long, Louisiana’s most infamous governor. The Ramos Gin Fizz gets its fizzy part from the combination of orange flower water and egg white, requiring prolonged and vigorous shaking to reach the right texture. Legend also has it that during Carnival 1915, Ramos’s bar employed over 30 bartenders to mix this famous drink, to meet the demand.

Sazerac

What’s in it: Rye whiskey or cognac, bitters, sugar, lemon peel, and an absinthe substitute (such as Pernod or Herbsaint).

Where to try it: The Bombay Club, The Sazerac Bar, but, really, many restaurants serve this elegant cocktail.

The origins of Sazerac are somewhat unclear, but New Orleans claims it has invented this very first cocktail ever. Reportedly it was developed in 1838 by New Orleans apothecary Antoine Amedie Peychaud using his special bitters and the Sazerac de Forge et Fils brand of cognac brandy (hence the name). By 1850 Sazerac was the country’s first branded cocktail, and its popularity hasn’t dimmed since.

Vieux Carré

What’s in it: Rye whiskey, cognac, sweet vermouth, Bénédictine, Angostura bitters, Peychaud’s bitters.

Where to try it: The Carousel Bar & Lounge, though you can find it at pretty much any craft cocktail bar in New Orleans.

Hotel Monteleone bartender Walter Bergeron invented this cocktail in 1938, named after the French Quarter. Bergeron was actually the head bartender of the hotel’s cocktail lounge that predated the current Carousel Bar, which opened in 1949. Basically, this is the New Orleans’ take on Manhattan.

Voodoo Daiquiri

What’s in it: Bourbon, Everclear (190 proof, grain alcohol) or vodka, grape juice; served frozen.

Where to try it: Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop.

The Voodoo Daiquiri is often also called “Purple Drank.” This sweet, grape-flavored frozen daiquiri is the signature cocktail at Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop, which has been operating since 1722, making it not only one of the oldest structures in New Orleans but also one of the oldest buildings that serve as a bar in the nation. It is said to have hosted the infamous privateer Jean Lafitte and his posse. Beware: The drink is super potent. Just look at the ingredients!

Happy imbibing!

If you are visiting New Orleans, book your stay at a beautiful New Orleans hotel close to the sounds of the city, the French Market Inn! This historic hotel is located in the heart of the New Orleans French Quarter, close to a multitude of popular New Orleans bars and restaurants.

This quaint hotel also gives you old New Orleans charm, without sacrificing any of the modern-day amenities that you want when staying at a hotel. When you stay at the French Market Inn, you can walk through meandering gardens and a beautiful stone-paved courtyard that allows you to enjoy a little oasis away from the hustle and bustle of the city.

Thanksgiving in the French Quarter

Photo by Mathew Schwartz on Unsplash

When Thanksgiving is upon us, summer weather is truly over, and the fall schedule is packed with fun activities you can only find in New Orleans. Plus, quite a few notable restaurants offer the prix fixe, a la carte, and buffet feasts of Southern classics on Thanksgiving Day. There’s turkey, of course, but also lots of traditional holiday favorites with a few contemporary twists. Here’s what you can do, see and eat if you find yourself in New Orleans for Thanksgiving.

Get to the Races

The opening day at the Fair Grounds Race Course (Thanksgiving Day, November 23, 2023) kicks off the holiday season for New Orleans, and you’ll see half the city donning spectacular hats and turning up at the racetrack to happily mingle, cocktails in hand, and to gorge on oysters and bet on horses. The races start at 11 a.m.

The racetrack also offers a Thanksgiving sit-down dinner in the Clubhouse and the Black Gold Room (reservations only). Prices range per seat for adults and children ages 12 and under. There’s also a first-come, first-served buffet in the Pan Zareta Room. Please note that the Clubhouse has a dress code, but you’d probably want to dress up anyway — and don’t forget the hat.

Bayou Classic

Each November the Bayou Classic draws the fans and alumni of Southern University and Grambling State University to New Orleans to partake in one of the country’s greatest college sports rivalries. The event stretches for four days and includes a fan fest, a parade, the Battle of the Bands, and, of course, the big game at the Superdome.

Thanksgiving Day Dining in the French Quarter or Nearby

Some of the city’s best restaurants will be offering multi-course Thanksgiving dinners in three formats — prix fixe, a la carte, and buffet. New Orleans celebrates food on any given day, but these holiday menus take it to another level, at the same time paying homage to the Southern culinary traditions.

The Louisiana spin on the traditional holiday bird is typically done three ways: deep-fried; smoked; and crawfish-style boiled with onions, garlic, potatoes, and crawfish boil spice. Then there’s the turducken, a New Orleans jazzed-up invention of a chicken inside of a duck inside of a turkey. Some traditional Louisiana recipes that make it into the chefs’ kitchens on Thanksgiving also include cornbread, oyster and Cajun dirty rice dressings, and pecan pie.

As it gets closer to Thanksgiving, check out what’s on the menu in some local restaurants on Thanksgiving Day. Restaurants participating in the past included such notables as Arnaud’s, Brennan’s, Muriel’s Jackson Square, and others. The restaurants typically post their special menus on their websites. This could be your best home away from home experience. Plus, someone else will be doing all the cooking!

Coming to New Orleans for Thanksgiving? Take advantage of the French Market Inn specials, group rates, and best-rate guarantee for greater savings to spend on New Orleans famous French Quarter cuisine and enjoying everything this magnificent city has to offer. Reserve your room today!